No Size Fits All – The Importance Of Learning Styles In Disciple Making

 
One size fits all. It’s great if you’re shopping for a Snuggie, but horrible if you’re making a disciple.  While we may understand this on a conceptual level, we often fail on a logistical level when we fail to ask the right questions while developing curriculum plans for our groups. 
A one-size discipleship strategy will, more often than not, result in a lot of people slipping through the cracks in your ministry. Central to your church’s strategy for making disciples and developing leaders will be a growing understanding of the different ways in which people learn and grow.  In this month’s Group Talk, Josh Rose breaks down core principles to understanding learning styles to better craft disciple-making environments. 

BONUS: (links to resources mentioned in the podcast) 
Book: 7 Kinds Of Smart-Identifying And Developing Your Multiple Intelligences 
Sample curriculums employing multiple learning styles  
http://www.rushcreek.org/connect/lifegroups/leader-resources

Josh Rose is the LifeGroups Pastor at The Church on Rush Creek in Arlington, Texas. He has led small group ministries for 10 years and is the Central DFW Huddle leader for the Small Group Network. Josh is also pursuing his PhD in Foundations of Christian Education at B. H. Carroll Theological Institute with a dissertation topic focused on small group formats and learning theory. He’s an avid follower of English soccer and proudly and loudly supports Manchester United! Josh resides in Mansfield, TX where he and his wife, Abby, raise 3 busy, yet incredibly awesome children. You can connect with Josh on Twitter @joshrose82 and on his blog joshmrose.net

 
 
 

One thought on “No Size Fits All – The Importance Of Learning Styles In Disciple Making”

  1. Josh – Thank you for sharing on the podcast. The 2 key things I took away from it for myself was 1) the need for more experiencial learning activities, and 2) learning styles are more complex than the broad categories we were taught in the past. We need to take learning style into account in our small groups to result in change through knowledge, skill, understanding. or attitude. Thanks again!

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